Category Archives: Organizations

Know Your Cornell Lingo!

“Do you know how to get to–?” Early on in your time at Cornell, you’re bound to have to ask that question a few times at least. As a head start in getting to know Cornell, it will be helpful to know campus-specific vocab. With a crash course in Cornell Lingo, you’ll save a lot of time and confusion early on. Acting as your Cornell linguist with insights into Cornell’s own vocab is Nina Kahn, a rising sophomore and PA, to introduce you to–first off–the Hilltop (campus’s most common nickname!).

Every college has their own unique vocabulary that pertains to the individual school community; Cornell is no exception. Most people have probably heard the term block plan since it is Cornell’s biggest identifier, but it is doubtful that they know the term ‘third week’. Students and teachers like to use the term ‘third week’ to describe the homestretch of the last full week of classes or the tired feelings that happens around that week. “My brain is in third week mode,” or “it’s third week, cut me a break.” Although ‘third week’ is sometimes met with mixed feelings, students push through it because they know fourth week is right around the corner, which means late night breakfast and block break! Continue reading Know Your Cornell Lingo!

Getting Involved

“What are you involved in?” For a Cornellian, that may be the scariest question out there. Guest Blogger Jordan Wolfe, ’17, a PA with NSO2015 talks about getting involved on campus and balancing activities. As one of Cornell’s NCAA III athletes, Jordan is well practiced in balancing athletics and the rigorous academics of Cornell. 

At Cornell, getting involved is extremely easy to do, with something new available for you wherever you look.  With 15 active Greek organizations, 19 NCAA Division III sports teams, and over 50 student organizations on campus, that makes for nearly 100 choices of groups to be a part of on the hilltop. Continue reading Getting Involved

Student Org Spotlight: NACC

Kayne Whyte, a rising Cornell senior and member of the Navajo Nation, shares on the NACC’s mission, place on campus, and events. The organization was chartered in 2012 and has quickly become an installment in Cornell’s intercultural and campus life. 

nacc

The Native Americans at Cornell College (N.A.C.C) student group is designed to promote support and awareness for the Native American student population and the greater Cornell College community. N.A.C.C seeks to engage its members and the community in enhancing their cultural identity and gain a multi-diverse perception of the world. Continue reading Student Org Spotlight: NACC

Finding Your Place at Cornell

Guest Blogger: Hayley Uzpen ’17 
Hayley, a PA for NSO 2015, talks about finding your place–and people–at Cornell. 

Starting college can tend to feel a little overwhelming. You are in a new place, with a new set of peers and finding where you belong can seem like a daunting task. New Student Orientation is a great place to begin to try to find where you feel most comfortable at Cornell. NSO offers you the chance to get to know your new classmates and their interests, as well as develop an idea of what you might be interested academically and with extracurriculars.

Cornell doesn’t just stop at NSO to help you explore interests: during the first couple weeks of school, Cornell holds their annual Student Activities Fair where most of the 50 plus student organizations and clubs on campus gather on the Orange Carpet and share about their group. During this time you can visit any booth which catches your interest and sign up to receive emails from these groups about when they meet, a little more about what they are about, and what they do during the year. The fair is a great way to see all of what Cornell has to offer you. If you happen to have an area of interest that Cornell doesn’t currently have a club or organization for, it is really easy to start your own group on campus. On the block plan it is important to have things to engage you outside of the classroom. Being involved on campus is a good way to meet people, learn about Cornell and the community, and stay involved in the school.

If you are looking for more of a social group, Cornell also offers a Meet the Greeks early in the fall, where you can meet all of the 15 sororities and fraternities of Cornell from the comfort of the Commons! During this time you can meet the active members and discover their values, history, and tradition.

The best advice that I received as a first year was to be a “joiner”. To experience all that Cornell has to offer, I think that this was really good advice. Go ahead and sign up for all of the clubs that interest you; out of there, chances are that you will find at least one group of like minded people who you can feel that shared connection and sense of community with . By joining groups on campus you get to know different ages at Cornell and make some unique connections. As you continue to attend meetings and events you can see which groups you are really passionate about and from there you can find your niche.

If organized clubs and other student groups do not really interest you, Cornell also offers lectures, presentations, and other extracurricular academic activities that you can attend. From these events you can meet others who are interested in the same subjects as you. Finding your place at Cornell comes from trial and error; as an incoming student don’t be afraid to put yourself out there, to experience all of Cornell.

Thanks to Hayley for this advice! Finding a niche in a new environment can seem scary, but there’s a place for everyone at Cornell. Don’t be afraid to try new things and go out of your comfort zone–you’re bound to find something of interest and other’s who feel the same. Cornell is a unique campus and is home to unique Cornellians–you’ll find your “place”, wherever that may be, and along the way, you’re bound to meet some pretty interesting people, and among them, “your people”. Keep in mind that over your time at Cornell, you will find multiple niches. I’ve heard Cornell society described as an ecosystem, and I really think it is–every single person on this campus brings something important to the campus climate, and in turn, that campus spirit of Cornell becomes a new home. We can’t wait to grow with you on campus!

Alternative Breaks at Cornell

Guest Blogger: Leah Bossom ’17. 
Wondering what it is we Cornellians get up to during breaks? Leah, a PA and ASB/AWB coordinator talks about the amazing opportunity of Alternative Breaks at Cornell. Learn about these unique experiences to grow as a student, citizen, leader, and individual possible through Cornell and get involved in an Alternative Break this year!   Continue reading Alternative Breaks at Cornell

Something New I Tried on Campus

Guest Blogger: Mimi Vukelich ’17
Mimi, a PA for NSO 2015, talks about her experience trying something new on campus her freshman year and finding a passion in Mock Trial. Cornell brag: Mimi was part of our Mock Trial team that headed to Nationals this spring!

When I first came to Cornell I wasn’t really sure what I wanted to be involved in. There were a few activities and organizations that interested me. People on my floor were getting involved in a wide variety of activities. I remember going to the activities fair on the OC. My friends and I circled around the OC, looking at all of the different activities. We put our names on various email lists and talked to different groups we were interested in. There is one group that, looking back, stands out in my mind but at the time it didn’t even appear on my radar; that group was Mock Trial. A week or so after the activities fair, there were flyers peppered around campus advertising Mock Trial try outs. I read them but didn’t really process what I was reading or consciously think I was going to try out. The tryout process, according to the fliers, involved a brief speech period followed by an interview. Continue reading Something New I Tried on Campus

Student Org Spotlight: BACO

Kayla Morton ’16, shares about BACO (Black Awareness Cultural Organization), one of the most active and multicultural student orgs at Cornell. BACO’s commitment to education, community, and celebration of diversity serves the entire Cornell campus in bringing awareness and understanding to black issues and developing a campus with cultural competency.
BACO

Continue reading Student Org Spotlight: BACO

Student Org Spotlight: TWRG

Guest Blogger: Hannah Warner ’17, a TWRG e-board officer–

Third Wave Resource Group (TWRG) serves as an on-campus resource for activism and support for third wave feminism on campus and in the surrounding community. We are activists who examine issues of race, gender, sexuality, and socioeconomic class through a feminist lens. Continue reading Student Org Spotlight: TWRG