Category Archives: Resources

Stressed? Check out the Stress Free Room at the Counseling Center!

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Did you know that the Counseling Center has a Stress Free Room? It has stress management resources including a massage chair, biofeedback software, books, brochures, and calming music. You can schedule a time to use the room online, by calling 319-895-4292, or by stopping by Ebersole.

Check out https://www.cornellcollege.edu/counseling/stress-free-scheduling/index.php for more information!

Know Your Cornell Lingo!

“Do you know how to get to–?” Early on in your time at Cornell, you’re bound to have to ask that question a few times at least. As a head start in getting to know Cornell, it will be helpful to know campus-specific vocab. With a crash course in Cornell Lingo, you’ll save a lot of time and confusion early on. Acting as your Cornell linguist with insights into Cornell’s own vocab is Nina Kahn, a rising sophomore and PA, to introduce you to–first off–the Hilltop (campus’s most common nickname!).

Every college has their own unique vocabulary that pertains to the individual school community; Cornell is no exception. Most people have probably heard the term block plan since it is Cornell’s biggest identifier, but it is doubtful that they know the term ‘third week’. Students and teachers like to use the term ‘third week’ to describe the homestretch of the last full week of classes or the tired feelings that happens around that week. “My brain is in third week mode,” or “it’s third week, cut me a break.” Although ‘third week’ is sometimes met with mixed feelings, students push through it because they know fourth week is right around the corner, which means late night breakfast and block break! Continue reading Know Your Cornell Lingo!

From Formerly Awkward to Formally Fly: The Art of Emailing a Professor

One of the biggest parts of college that no one tells you about? Emailing. All of the emails. As you’ve already learned this summer, Cornell email accounts are a HUGE part of communication and information  on campus. Things move fast at Cornell and email is no different. On Cornell campus, you will be involved in a lot and as such, you’ll be on a lot of mailing lists. There will be club meeting reminders, emails from your RA, campus news, a line of communication with classmates, and essential emails from your professor. Sometimes, you’re going to need to hit reply on some pretty important emails. To act as your Jedi-email master in this  art of emailing a professor is Chris Machold, a PA in the class of 2016, whose Jedi skills of emailing a professor he now imparts to you. 

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Transitioning from communication with high school teachers to liberal arts college professors can be an unexpectedly intimidating venture: Continue reading From Formerly Awkward to Formally Fly: The Art of Emailing a Professor

Developing a Relationship with Your Advisor

Guest Blogger Chloe Rossier,  a sophomore in the class of 2018 and a PA with NSO 2015 shares about developing a relationship with your advisor. 

Chloe --advisor

First of all, to all those reading, I just want to say congratulations on choosing Cornell College! I have to tell you from my experience that college is even better than you’re thinking it will be. However, right now it is still new, still in the future, and of course, a bit nerve racking. Don’t worry because it is the same for everyone! Continue reading Developing a Relationship with Your Advisor

Choosing Classes, Finding Books, and assorted Academic Know-How

Let’s face it: I’m a bit of a nerd. And as a nerd, I’m here to impart to you my knowledge of the ins and outs of some of the academic sides of Cornell. During this (rather long) post, we’ll tackle some of the bigger questions about Cornell academics that you may have coming in this fall, such as searching for classes, course requirements, understanding the ‘bidding system’, finding book lists and ordering books, getting support, and a lot more things that are good to be aware of. Browse, read at your own pace, and get excited for the amazing experience ahead of you as a Cornell student!  Continue reading Choosing Classes, Finding Books, and assorted Academic Know-How

Getting to Know Your Roommate

With rooming assignments coming out soon, it’s natural to be curious about who you’ll be sharing a room with during your first year at Cornell. Guest Blogger Ellie Burshtyn ’18, a PA, offers some insight and tips into getting to know your roommate to make you more comfortable with your roommate, res hall living, and transition to life at Cornell.

Some of you may have shared a room with someone before. However, there is probably one big difference: you most likely knew the person. Moving in with someone that you know nothing about can be stressful and result in a lot of anxiety, which is completely normal. So here are some suggestions on getting to know and getting along with your new roomie.  Continue reading Getting to Know Your Roommate

Finding Your Place at Cornell

Guest Blogger: Hayley Uzpen ’17 
Hayley, a PA for NSO 2015, talks about finding your place–and people–at Cornell. 

Starting college can tend to feel a little overwhelming. You are in a new place, with a new set of peers and finding where you belong can seem like a daunting task. New Student Orientation is a great place to begin to try to find where you feel most comfortable at Cornell. NSO offers you the chance to get to know your new classmates and their interests, as well as develop an idea of what you might be interested academically and with extracurriculars.

Cornell doesn’t just stop at NSO to help you explore interests: during the first couple weeks of school, Cornell holds their annual Student Activities Fair where most of the 50 plus student organizations and clubs on campus gather on the Orange Carpet and share about their group. During this time you can visit any booth which catches your interest and sign up to receive emails from these groups about when they meet, a little more about what they are about, and what they do during the year. The fair is a great way to see all of what Cornell has to offer you. If you happen to have an area of interest that Cornell doesn’t currently have a club or organization for, it is really easy to start your own group on campus. On the block plan it is important to have things to engage you outside of the classroom. Being involved on campus is a good way to meet people, learn about Cornell and the community, and stay involved in the school.

If you are looking for more of a social group, Cornell also offers a Meet the Greeks early in the fall, where you can meet all of the 15 sororities and fraternities of Cornell from the comfort of the Commons! During this time you can meet the active members and discover their values, history, and tradition.

The best advice that I received as a first year was to be a “joiner”. To experience all that Cornell has to offer, I think that this was really good advice. Go ahead and sign up for all of the clubs that interest you; out of there, chances are that you will find at least one group of like minded people who you can feel that shared connection and sense of community with . By joining groups on campus you get to know different ages at Cornell and make some unique connections. As you continue to attend meetings and events you can see which groups you are really passionate about and from there you can find your niche.

If organized clubs and other student groups do not really interest you, Cornell also offers lectures, presentations, and other extracurricular academic activities that you can attend. From these events you can meet others who are interested in the same subjects as you. Finding your place at Cornell comes from trial and error; as an incoming student don’t be afraid to put yourself out there, to experience all of Cornell.

Thanks to Hayley for this advice! Finding a niche in a new environment can seem scary, but there’s a place for everyone at Cornell. Don’t be afraid to try new things and go out of your comfort zone–you’re bound to find something of interest and other’s who feel the same. Cornell is a unique campus and is home to unique Cornellians–you’ll find your “place”, wherever that may be, and along the way, you’re bound to meet some pretty interesting people, and among them, “your people”. Keep in mind that over your time at Cornell, you will find multiple niches. I’ve heard Cornell society described as an ecosystem, and I really think it is–every single person on this campus brings something important to the campus climate, and in turn, that campus spirit of Cornell becomes a new home. We can’t wait to grow with you on campus!

Alternative Breaks at Cornell

Guest Blogger: Leah Bossom ’17. 
Wondering what it is we Cornellians get up to during breaks? Leah, a PA and ASB/AWB coordinator talks about the amazing opportunity of Alternative Breaks at Cornell. Learn about these unique experiences to grow as a student, citizen, leader, and individual possible through Cornell and get involved in an Alternative Break this year!   Continue reading Alternative Breaks at Cornell

Student Org Spotlight: BACO

Kayla Morton ’16, shares about BACO (Black Awareness Cultural Organization), one of the most active and multicultural student orgs at Cornell. BACO’s commitment to education, community, and celebration of diversity serves the entire Cornell campus in bringing awareness and understanding to black issues and developing a campus with cultural competency.
BACO

Continue reading Student Org Spotlight: BACO

Local Banks and ATMs

Guest Blogger: Gabe Flippo ’16
Gabe Flippo, a PA from the senior class, shares a Cornell insider’s tips to local banks and ATMS for incoming Cornellians. 

Money is important! Everybody needs money. However, on top of needing money, you need to be able to access your money. Out of all of my friends and fellow students at Cornell College, I have had a very pleasant experience using banks and ATMS throughout my three years so far at Cornell. There are three main reasons behind this:
1. I avoid fee charges that many ATM’s carry
2. I have an Mt Vernon Bank account and
3. I learned to budget my money.
This blog post will explain how to have the best banking and ATM experience using some helpful tips I’ve learned over the years. Continue reading Local Banks and ATMs