Category Archives: Gwensday Wednesday

How-to resource for student leaders from the Director of Student Life, Gwen Schimek

It’s On Us Video Contest

We’ve spent some time thinking about sexual assault awareness this year and for your block break between blocks 2 & 3, I want to challenge you to take part in the national “It’s On Us” campaign.  It’s On Us is about asking for consent, it’s on us to intervene; to support survivors; to create a culture of respect.

At Cornell, we think this is especially important and we’ll be asking you to join the campaign throughout second block.  During 4th week, we’ll unveil a couple of videos we are working on to support the campaign, but we think you probably have some creative ideas as well.

The Sunday before Block 3 begins, you’ll need to upload your video to google drive and share it with Gwen Schimek, Dean of Students.  In the meantime, think about your It’s On Us messages.  First place group gets a meal cooked by Gwen.  Second place gets dessert or snacks cooked by Gwen.

Rules:

  • Create a video promoting the It’s On Us campaign. Research statistics, information, and other items related to sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, and sexual harassment and write a script, find some actors, and cut it all together.
  • Maximum length: 60 seconds
  • Deadline for submission: 8:00 p.m. October 30
  • Questions? Contact gschimek

Get inspired:

Smoking On Campus

Since the return to campus a few weeks ago, I’ve noticed an increase in the number of students who are using e-cigarettes, vaping, and other mechanisms to get a hit of nicotine or other items.  I want to make sure that you are aware that these are also in violation of our smoking policy on campus, in alignment with the Iowa Smoke-Free Act.

We have already been enforcing the policy, but want to make sure folks are aware of this as we continue to enforce the policy and students found to be using these devices or smoking on college property will go through the conduct process.

Alcohol

Last week we spent some time exploring consent and this week I want to share some information about another important topic: alcohol use and alcohol poisoning.

Of course, Cornell College has an alcohol policy and I’d be remiss to not share it with you.  You can go read it online.  I know some of you will choose to use alcohol underage, but I want to encourage responsible use of alcohol.

  • Compliance with State and Federal statutes regarding alcohol use, possession, and distribution;
  • Making informed decisions about whether and/or when to use alcohol;
  • Knowing your alcohol tolerance limits and not exceeding them;
  • Behaving in a way that is not disruptive or otherwise harmful to you or others when you are consuming alcohol;
  • Assuming accountability for your actions while under the influence of alcohol;
  • Avoiding binge drinking. The Harvard School of Public Health has established a nationally accepted definition of binge drinking as:
    • For women, drinking four or more alcoholic beverages per drinking occasion.
    • For men, drinking five or more alcoholic beverages per drinking occasion.
    • One alcoholic beverage is defined as one 12 oz. can/bottle of beer, one 5 oz. glass of wine, or one shot (1.5 oz.) of hard liquor.
  • Not coercing or forcing anyone of any age to consume alcohol;
  • Not coercing or forcing anyone to engage in sexual activity when either or both of you have been consuming alcohol;
  • Refraining from engaging or participating in drinking games.

You should also know Cornell has a Good Samaritan policy.  If there is a time when you are concerned about a friend using alcohol, and potential alcohol poisoning, our first priority is others’ safety and we want you to call for help.

A former student of mine shared this post with Huffington Post called “21 Lessons I Learned After One Year as a Sober 21-Year-Old.”  If you think you have a problem with alcohol, or know someone who might, I’d encourage you to check it out.  You can also take a free online screening that is anonymous and will help you to know whether drinking has become a problem for you.

Sexual Assault and Consent

 

We need to talk about sexual assault.  We know that sexual assault happens far too frequently, and the start of the academic year can be a time that is especially problematic around sexual assault.  We also know that national statistics demonstrate that 1 in 5 women and 1 in 16 men are sexually assaulted while in college.  Not only this, but 93% of victims of sexual assault know the assailant.

Important in our understanding is making sure we are all on the same page about consent.  Consent is one of the areas where communication needs to be more clear.Our sexual misconduct policy outlines our definition of consent, but this video does a pretty great job as well:

If you, or someone you know, has been the victim of sexual assault while at Cornell, I encourage you to report it to the student affairs office by filling out an incident report, but also to utilize the resources available on campus:

Fully Confidential Resources

 

Confidential Campus Resources

  • Sexual Misconduct Liaison: Cornell College’s Sexual Misconduct Liaison is a member of the college staff outside the Dean of Students’ office and conduct system whose role is to provide support and information to students who may have experienced sexual harassment or assault. This person can provide information about resources and reporting options without initiating any formal investigation or complaint. Sharon Grice; Peter Paul Luce Admissions Center; 319-895-4162

Ram Alerts

Over the past few weeks, we have seen a number of instances across the country where campuses have needed to alert their students about something quickly.  We have our own system, the Ram Alert system, which can also help you to do this.

If you’re not signed up (or even if you are), please take a few minutes today to update your Ram Alert status and contact information.  We have not registered you for the service, so you’ll need to sign up for emergency notifications.

Pass/Fail Option?

Instead of focusing on a policy in our code of conduct, The Compass, today, I wanted to spend some time focusing on one of our grade options.  Students may have heard about other institutions of higher education offering a pass/fail option.  Cornell, however, has a different view of the policy and action MUST be taken in the first three days of the block in order to exercise the option, so we wanted to clarify the policy a little bit.

All of the information about our Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory option is available in our academic catalogue.  Individuals wanting to explore the S/U option need to complete an S/U form within the first three days of the block and return it to the Registrar’s Office in Old Sem.  If, on the 15th day of the block, you determine you would rather take your grade, you can rescind the S/U option.  Students can use a maximum of two S/U credits towards the 31 required for graduation.

That being said, there is a distinct reason why we say S/U, instead of Pass/Fail.  Satisfactory grades are grades C and above.  If you receive a C- or below, the grade is considered Unsatisfactory and does not earn a credit nor allow you to use the course to satisfy prerequisites.  Find out more in the 2015-2016 academic catalogue.

Good Samaritan Policy

By now, you’ve probably looked at the student code of conduct (The Compass) once or twice this year — we have made some changes from previous years (you’ll get an email outlining those changes between now and October 1).

With this all in mind, I continue to want to make sure you were all aware of our Good Samaritan Statement.  The past few weeks have been filled with information regarding the sexual misconduct policy, and when you might want to reach out to others around sexual assault.  The Good Samaritan statement also highlights reaching out for assistance when someone is in need of it.

The basic concept of the statement is that it is more important to get help for another student in their time of need than to not reach out because you are afraid of getting in trouble yourself.  We offer limited immunity for you if you are helping someone in need.  With that, we encourage you to continue to step up and help each other out.  As we’ve discussed during orientation the past few years, help be the snackman:

Consent 101

Continuing last week’s conversation around consent, I want to make sure there still aren’t any questions about consent.  Some folks might believe talking about consent can be a challenge.  Laci Green gives some great advice about how to ask about consent.  See them here:

We’re starting with talking about sexual assault.  We know that sexual assault happens far too frequently, and the start of the academic year can be a time that is especially problematic around sexual assault.  We also know that national statistics demonstrate that 1 in 5 women and 1 in 16 men are sexually assaulted while in college.  Not only this, but 93% of victims of sexual assault know the assailant.

Important in our understanding is making sure we are all on the same page about consent.  As a reminder, our sexual misconduct policy outlines our definition of consent.

If you, or someone you know, has been the victim of sexual assault while at Cornell, I encourage you to report it to the dean of students office by filling out an incident report, but also to utilize the resources available on campus:

Fully Confidential Resources

 

Confidential Campus Resources

  • Sexual Misconduct Liaison: Cornell College’s Sexual Misconduct Liaison is a member of the college staff outside the Dean of Students’ office and conduct system whose role is to provide support and information to students who may have experienced sexual harassment or assault. This person can provide information about resources and reporting options without initiating any formal investigation or complaint. Sharon Grice; Peter Paul Luce Admissions Center; 319-895-4162

Consent is like tea

Welcome back!

To those of you who were here last year, you  know that on Wednesdays, I would post something that might be helpful for student organizations.  As I’ve transitioned into the dean of students role on campus, I am sharing some other things that might be helpful to know about in terms of our community, The Compass, or showing one another respect.

We’re starting with talking about sexual assault.  We know that sexual assault happens far too frequently, and the start of the academic year can be a time that is especially problematic around sexual assault.  We also know that national statistics demonstrate that 1 in 5 women and 1 in 16 men are sexually assaulted while in college.  Not only this, but 93% of victims of sexual assault know the assailant.

Important in our understanding is making sure we are all on the same page about consent.  Our sexual misconduct policy outlines our definition of consent, but this video does a pretty great job as well:

If you, or someone you know, has been the victim of sexual assault while at Cornell, I encourage you to report it to the dean of students office by filling out an incident report, but also to utilize the resources available on campus:

Fully Confidential Resources

 

Confidential Campus Resources

  • Sexual Misconduct Liaison: Cornell College’s Sexual Misconduct Liaison is a member of the college staff outside the Dean of Students’ office and conduct system whose role is to provide support and information to students who may have experienced sexual harassment or assault. This person can provide information about resources and reporting options without initiating any formal investigation or complaint. Sharon Grice; Peter Paul Luce Admissions Center; 319-895-4162